Weekly News Briefing (Sept 15-21, 2019)

 

Dear Globalists, 

We have always felt the need to not only start conversations around what’s happening in our vicinity, but also bring awareness to the lives that take place seemingly worlds away from us. Starting September 2019, we fulfill this need with Daily News Bites and Weekly News Briefings.

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This week we have a special #GlobaliSight Focus: Southeast Asia’s ENVIRONMENTAL issues caused by record-breaking bushfires.

Indonesia haze: Breathing in south east Asia's hazardous smoke 

BBC made this short documentary about how Indonesian forest fires create a smoky haze every year that can cover the region. The fires consequently worsen people’s long-term health problems, especially respiratory-related illnesses among kids (BBC).

Forest fires take place almost every year in Southeast Asia, casting a smoky haze over some countries in the region. Photo courtesy: Bjorn Vaughn | BBC News

Forest fires take place almost every year in Southeast Asia, casting a smoky haze over some countries in the region. Photo courtesy: Bjorn Vaughn | BBC News

Digging Into the Cause — Indonesia Haze: Why do Forests Keep Burning?

Almost every year, a smoky haze blankets the South East Asia signaling the return of forest fires. Grey skies and a lingering acrid smell are familiar to the countries in the region, which saw some of the worst haze levels in years happen in 2019: 328,724 hectares of land burnt this year from January to August alone (BBC).

Further Influences — Singapore Grand Prix: How will haze affect the drivers and fans?

The haze in Indonesia and Malaysia led to poor air quality in their neighboring country of Singapore, where Formula 1 Grand Prix took place this past weekend. If the haze was persisting and visibility dropping, drivers would either race in harsher conditions or the race would be called off (BBC).

Let’s review some news on POLITICS that happened this week: Hong Kong protests continue, Spain’s fourth election in four years and U.S.-China potential dispute on El Salvador.

The masked protesters in Hong Kong hurled gasoline bombs at governmental buildings. Photo courtesy: Lam Yik Fei | The New York Times

The masked protesters in Hong Kong hurled gasoline bombs at governmental buildings. Photo courtesy: Lam Yik Fei | The New York Times

HK Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices

Black-clad protesters in Hong Kong hurled gasoline bombs at government offices in central HK last Sunday. Tens of thousands of pro-democracy protesters were marching when they descended into clouds of tear gas deployed by the police. The police also used water cannons after protesters vandalized a subway station and hurled bricks and gasoline bombs at the city’s legislature building (NYT).

Spain to Hold Fourth Election in Four Years

Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez announced Tuesday of “having failed to secure enough support in parliament to form a government,” leading to Spain’s fourth election in four years. The new election will be held on Nov. 10, while the previous one took place in April. There is no consensus on who will be the candidates so far (BBC).

To Influence El Salvador, China Dangled Money. The U.S. Made Threats.

China’s ambition to create a large commercial port in El Salvador’s Isla Perico might lead to a dispute between Beijing and Washington. American officials in El Salvador perceive China as an untrustworthy partner, while China claims a possible win-win result (NYT).

Finally, let’s shift to SOCIETY topics: sexual assault at British universities, Syrian child refugees saved a German village’s student rate and DR Congo’s new Ebola vaccines.

British Universities 'Failing' Victims of Sexual Misconduct

A BBC investigation found that more than 700 allegations of sexual misconduct were reported across British universities in the past academic year. Students accused their universities of being afraid of reputational damage and thus not offering support. One student was told by her college to spend the night in the library after she told them she could not return to her house due to her fear of another attack (BBC).

Syrian Children Saved a German Village. And a Village Saved Itself.

Golzow, Germany had a record-low number of school-age children before hundreds of thousands of migrants arrived in the country in the summer of 2015. A village, which lost a third of its people after the fall of the Berlin Wall, is given a new life as immigrant children repopulate local schools. “The Syrians saved our school,” Mayor Frank Schütz said (NYT).

A Hard Lesson for Migrants Who Give Up: There May Be No Welcome Mat Back Home

The fishing village in Senegal has long sent its men abroad for work, but the men kept coming back empty-handed. Fisherman El Hadji Macoura Diop, 37, failed to reach Europe by boat and was afraid of going back home and disappointing his family (NYT).

Health workers among others who had contact with Ebola patients received the new vaccine. Photo courtesy: Getty Image

Health workers among others who had contact with Ebola patients received the new vaccine. Photo courtesy: Getty Image

DR Congo to Introduce Second Ebola Vaccine

In the second largest outbreak on record, more than 2,100 people died from Ebola in DR Congo, and the government is planning to implement a second vaccine by Johnson & Johnson to control the spread of the virus (BBC).

'Cocktail of pollutants' Found in Dolphins in English Channel

A study led by Dr. Krishna Das of the University of Liege found some of the highest recorded levels of toxic chemicals in bottlenose dolphins off the French coast, home to one of the last remaining large European populations of bottlenose dolphins. Further research will be done to tackle the "invisible" problem of lingering pollutants in the oceans (BBC).


News and Copy Editor Kaizhao (Zero) Lin, a junior studying international relations and newspaper journalism at Syracuse University, wants to discover and retell the stories that he feels empathetic and grateful to.