Weekly News Briefing (Sept 30 – Oct 5, 2019)

 

Dear Globalists, 

We have always felt the need to not only start conversations around what’s happening in our vicinity, but also bring awareness to the lives that take place seemingly worlds away from us. Starting September 2019, we fulfill this need with Daily News Bites and Weekly News Briefings.

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This week, our special #GlobaliSight focus is WORLDWIDE PROTESTS: Hong Kong and Iraq issues.

The police in Hong Kong shot a pro-democracy protester Tuesday for the first time. Photo courtesy: Kin Cheung | AP

The police in Hong Kong shot a pro-democracy protester Tuesday for the first time. Photo courtesy: Kin Cheung | AP

Hongkong: Protester Is Shot By Police As Clashes Over Democracy Take A Dark Turn

The police in Hong Kong shot a pro-democracy protester Tuesday for the first time, escalating tension between the two sides after months of violence. It was confirmed by the hospital authority that a male protester has been hospitalized (NPR).

Iraq protests: Shots fired as demonstrators defy Baghdad curfew

At least 19 protestors have been killed since Tuesday in Baghdad and other Iraqi cities due to conflicts with the security force. The root cause of the protest is the high unemployment, poor services and corruption within the country. The protests appeared to lack of organized leadership and are the largest ones since PM Adel Abdul Mahdi entered the office (BBC).

Let’s review some news on POLITICS that happened this past week: Brexit, attack in Paris police HQ and climate change support for Pacific islands.

China held its 70th anniversary parade on Oct. 1st, its National Day, at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Plenty of unseen weaponaries were first exposed to its people. Photo courtesy: Kevin Frayer | Getty Images

China held its 70th anniversary parade on Oct. 1st, its National Day, at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Plenty of unseen weaponaries were first exposed to its people. Photo courtesy: Kevin Frayer | Getty Images


China: In Pictures: China’s National Day Parade Features Pomp and Artillery

The country’s largest ever military parade took place in Beijing on Tuesday, celebrating its 70th anniversary after the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. The parade began in Tiananmen Square and included “100,000 performers, 15,000 goose-stepping soldiers and an array of heavy-duty weaponry” (NYT).

Brexit: New UK plan for Northern Ireland to stay in single market

The new plan for Brexit allows Northern Ireland to stay in the European single market for goods but leads to new customs checks. Northern Ireland would need to approve it and vote every four years on the plan if it wants to continue the plan. (BBC).

Civilian employee killed 4 in knife attack at Paris police HQ

A technology administrator, who launched the attack from his office to other parts of the police headquarter with a knife without warning signs, killed four officers on Thursday. He was shot dead at the scene. Three of the victims were police officers, the other one an administrator (ABC).

'We Need Support': Pacific Islands Seek Help And Unity To Fight Climate Change

President Hilda Heine of the Marshall Islands, a country in the central Pacific Ocean, asked for more resources and support in the United Nations session and its environmental conferences earlier this week. (NPR).

Last but not least, let’s shift to SOCIETY news: Australian gun control, Venezuela’s lomo taxistas and the discovery of a 2,200-year-old Egyptian temple.

Shooting in Sydney Raises Questions About Gun Control

A gunman was shot dead by Sydney police on Wednesday after firing at a home and two police stations for about an hour. The case raises concerns over gun control in Australia. Gun ownership has increased over the past two decades, with each owner possessing an average of 3.9 guns compared with 2.1 in 1997 (NYT).

Venezuelan border town swells with internal migrants

Dozens of young men in Venezuela, known as “lomo taxistas” meaning taxis of the lower back, carry suitcases of merchandise that they bought from Colombia as they walk across the crowded bus terminal. They spend much of the day wandering around with their heavy backpacks. “I didn’t expect to stay here, but I had to because I didn’t have more money to continue my journey” (ABC).

2,200-year-old Egyptian temple discovered

On Sept. 29, Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities claimed on Facebook that sanitation workers discovered unexpected remains of a 2,200-year-old temple, which may belong to Pharaoh Ptolemy IV, the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt from 221 to 204 B.C. The temple is in the village of Kom Shakau, in the Tama township of northern Sohag (ABC).

Egypt claimed that sanitation workers discovered an unexpected remains of a 2,200-year-old temple, which may belong to Pharaoh Ptolemy IV, the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt from 221 to 204 B.C. Photo courtesy: Egypt Ministry of Antiquities

Egypt claimed that sanitation workers discovered an unexpected remains of a 2,200-year-old temple, which may belong to Pharaoh Ptolemy IV, the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt from 221 to 204 B.C. Photo courtesy: Egypt Ministry of Antiquities


News and Copy Editor Kaizhao (Zero) Lin, a junior studying international relations and newspaper journalism at Syracuse University, wants to discover and retell the stories that he feels empathetic and grateful to.