Weekly News Briefing (Sept 8-14, 2019)

 

Dear Globalists, 

We have always felt the need to not only start conversations around what’s happening in our vicinity, but also bring awareness to the lives that take place seemingly worlds away from us. Starting September 2019, we fulfill this need with Daily News Bites and Weekly News Briefings.

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The main issues in this week’s POLITICS are: the postponed Taliban talk, Brexit, international nuclear dispute and the COP conference in the U.K.

Taliban Talks Hit a Wall Over Deeper Disagreements, Officials Say

President Trump has called off a negotiation with the Taliban, possibly leading to more negotiations on the peace deal for the resistance. The Taliban refused to negotiate directly with the Afghan government but waits for an agreement with the United States, said a senior Taliban leader. Trump has also made a promise in regards to the issue in his past election: End the Afghan war. (NYT)

Brexit extension: PM to 'test law to limit' to avoid delay

Before the former PM Theresa May resigned in June, Britain postponed its exit from the EU to Oct 31. The British government works to find a deal before Oct. 19; otherwise, it may exit the EU without a deal. “We've got to prevent Boris Johnson from forcing through a no-deal because of the damage it could do for our country,” said John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor. (BBC)

Iran Breaks With More Limits in Nuclear Deal as It Pushes for European Aid

Iran said it is going to violate another set of limits on its nuclear research and production in the 2015 agreement with Trump. Iran might put more pressure on European nations to find a way of escaping America’s sanctions, while the U.S. is also not confident whether Europe will take a stance on the sanctions on Iran. (NYT)

People at the Seoul Railway Station Tuesday saw a file image of a North Korean missile launch on a TV program. Photo courtesy: Ahn Young-Joon/Associated Press

People at the Seoul Railway Station Tuesday saw a file image of a North Korean missile launch on a TV program. Photo courtesy: Ahn Young-Joon/Associated Press

North Korea Launches 2 More Projectiles, Its 8th Weapons Test Since July

North Korea had its new nuclear test on Tuesday after proposing a new denuclearization talk with the U.S. this month. Two early US-DPRK talks left no solutions on the issue so far. South Korea was still unclear about what kind of weapons were tested. (NYT)

COP26: Glasgow to host UN climate change summit in 2020

The UK will host the main summit of the 26th Conference of the Parties while partnering with Italy that takes charge of preparatory and youth events. Aimed at eliciting a global response to urgent climate issues, the UN summit is expecting up to 30,000 delegates atGlasgow's Scottish Events Campus. (BBC)

Let’s shift to SOCIETY issues: Australia bushfire, Dorian after care and Japanese paternity leave issue.

Australia Bushfires Arrive Early, Destroying Historic Lodge in ‘Omen’ of Future

A bushfire destroyed Binna Burra Lodge, one of Australia’s oldest nature resorts. Officials had warned that climate change would cause its worst fire season on record. Typically wetter and cooler rainforests are under concerns that they are experiencing heat and low rainfall, according to Joëlle Gergis, a climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University.  (NYT)

After Dorian, Cruise Lines Offer Meals, Supplies and Rides to Safety

In order to help with relief, companies like Disney, which have a difficult relationship with the Bahamas, supported it with the most robust corporate in response to the devastating Hurricane Dorian, which is recorded as a Category 5 storm and “has so far killed at least 50 people and wrecked thousands of homes.”  (NYT)

Two Men in Japan Dared to Take Paternity Leave. It Cost Them Dearly, They Say.

Japan is one of the countries with the best paternity leave policy, while only 3% of men in 2016 really exercised this right. Two men who recently had paternity leaves are suing their employers because the companies demoted and paid them less after they returned. “With a declining birthrate and the economic necessity that more women work, Japan desperately needs more fathers to help out at home.”  (NYT)

A Japanese man, who has taken paternity leave and been punished, entered a Tokyo court Thursday. Photo courtesy: Behrouz Mehri/Agence and France-Presse/Getty Images

A Japanese man, who has taken paternity leave and been punished, entered a Tokyo court Thursday. Photo courtesy: Behrouz Mehri/Agence and France-Presse/Getty Images

Finally, let’s go over some ARTS & TECHNOLOGY news: Huawei’s 5G sale and Marie Claire’s final issue in the UK.

Huawei chief offers to share 5G know-how for a fee

In response to U.S. concerns on being spied, Ren Zhengfeng, Huawei's chief executive, has proposed its sale of 5G know-how to a Western firm. Steve Tsang, professor at Soas University of London, commented that this shows Huawei’s willingness to move forward to try and win the West's trust.  (BBC)

An edition of Marie Claire UK from February 2018. About 35% of the magazine’s circulation is given away. Photo Courtesy: Marie Claire

An edition of Marie Claire UK from February 2018. About 35% of the magazine’s circulation is given away. Photo Courtesy: Marie Claire

Marie Claire will stop printing in UK (producing UK print magazine after November)

A pity for the print fashion magazine industry! TI Media says it is making the change to confront declining print sales and that Marie Claire will stop its print edition starting this November but will still publish online because the website has two million monthly users. "A strategy focusing on Marie Claire UK's digital business will give the brand the best opportunity to secure a profitable and sustainable future." (BBC)


News and Copy Editor Kaizhao (Zero) Lin, a junior studying international relations and newspaper journalism at Syracuse University, wants to discover and retell the stories that he feels empathetic and grateful to.